Crochet Velvet Double Ribbed Blanket

I’ve made a blanket for my friend’s daughter who will be off to college in the fall. It’s warm, soft, feels weighted (that’s a good thing these days for stress relief I hear) and okay, I’m having a hard time letting it go! This is one blanket I finished and my husband asked me to make for him. That is high praise! 

I used all front post and back post double crochet which is one of two types of stitches I’ve narrowed down to use with velvet. I’ve seen comments around the crochet community where people aren’t so happy with the loops that pull out after your work is finished. I’ve had that happen too. But a post stitch DC seems to do a really good job of keeping the loops under control. 

Velvet needs to be worked tightly and possibly a smaller hook than the package calls for. As always, I highly recommend working a practice swatch so you can get it all worked out ahead of time. (I made a Youtube tutorial for this blanket and we make a small swatch together. It will be linked at the end.)

And if you are wondering, the other stitch I use and have had success with velvet is Wide HDC. (Formerly called by us as HDC worked in between the posts.) Searching for the tops of stitches in velvet is difficult for me so I think that is why I am preferring to work around posts, or in between them. 

improv crochet in pink and grey velvet
example of wide HDC, and also carrying the yarn through and switching colors in an improv way.

We have a section of all the velvet blankets we’ve made under the blankets tab if you want to look through them all. 

Probably the most difficult part of this blanket is working the corners of the border. But I go over it in the video, so hopefully I’ve done a good job explaining how I was able to get around them, while still maintaining the double ribbed sequencing. 

Other than that, I’m calling this one advanced beginner-friendly and I really think you’ll like making this. Have fun! 

Materials

6 Balls Bernat Velvet in Misty Gray (Note, this is not Baby Velvet, please click the highlighted link to read the yarn information.)

Size H-5mm crochet hook

Scissors

Tapestry needle

Finished size: approximately 38 in by 49 in

(A PDF of this pattern is available on Etsy.)

Stitches

DC = Double Crochet.  Yarn over (YO), insert your hook, pull up a loop, YO, pull through two loops, YO, pull through remaining two loops. 

FPDC = Front Post Double Crochet. Yarn over, insert your hook from front to back and back to the front around the post from the row below. Yarn over and pull through 2 loops, yarn over and pull through final two loops, stitch complete. 

BPDC- Back Post Double Crochet: Yarn over, insert your hook from back to front and front to the back around the post from the row below. Yarn over and pull through 2 loops, yarn over and pull through final two loops, stitch complete. 

Pattern

Chain 106.

(Or to make your own base chain, multiply an odd number by two, then add 4. For example, for my blanket I multiplied 51 x 2, which equals 102, then added 4 for a base chain of 106. You can use a measuring tape to ensure that your base chain is the width you desire.)

ROW 1: Starting in the 4th chain from the hook, work a double crochet (DC) in each chain. When you reach the end of the chain, chain 2 and turn. 

ROW 2: Work front post double crochets (FPDC) around each of the first two posts (not around the turning chain). Then work back post double crochets (BPDC) around each of the next two posts. Continue alternating 2 FPDC and 2 BPDC to the end of the row. At the end of the row work a regular DC, inserting your hook underneath the turning chain. Chain 2 and turn. 

ROW 3: Work BPDCs around each of the first two posts. Then work FPDCs around each of the next two posts. Continue alternating 2 BPDCs and 2 FPDCs to the end of the row. Then, work a regular DC, inserting your hook underneath the turning chain. Chain 2 and turn. 

Repeat Rows 2 and 3 until you have 10 rows of double ribbing. 

ROW 11: *Work FPDC around each of the first two posts. (You are reversing the directions of the posts to create the shorter ribbed sections.) Work BPDC around each of the next two posts. Repeat from * across the row. End with one DC underneath and around the turning chain. Ch 2 and turn. 

ROW 12: *Work BPDC around each of the first two posts. Work FPDC around each of the next two posts. Repeat from * across the row. End with DC underneath and around the turning chain. Ch 2 and turn. 

ROW 13: Repeat row 11. 

Until your blanket measures approximately 42 inches, repeat rows 2 through 13. End with one repeat of rows 2 and 3.

Tip: There are 10 rows of ribbing worked for the elongated sections, with 3 rows of ribbing in the reverse direction. End the blanket with one elongated section of 10 rows, then begin the border.

Border

FIRST SIDE: You may begin the border after your last row of elongated ribbing by chaining 2 and turning to work down the side of the work. *Work 2 FPDCs, then 2 BPDCs around the ends of the posts on the side of the blanket (treat the horizontal bar of the last stitch of the row as the post to work around)  Repeat from * to the first corner. 

Tip: if you find that your work is pulling the side of the blanket too tightly, switch to a larger hook to work down the sides, then switch back to the smaller hook for the bottom and top sides.)

Work 3 DC into the first corner. (If you ended up with not an equal amount of paired posts, that is okay, work the single post to maintain the pattern, and then work 3 DC into the corner space.)

BOTTOM SIDE: Work FPDC around FPDC, and BPDC around BPDC, across the end of the blanket. Work 3 DC into the corner space. 

Repeat the instructions from for the FIRST SIDE for the second side starting from * in FIRST SIDE instructions. 

Repeat the instructions for the BOTTOM SIDE as you work across the top. 

Do not join the round, do not turn. 

Round 2: *Work FPDC around FPDC posts and work BPDC around BPDC posts. When you reach the corners, work the first post of the 3 DC that is the corner in the same direction of the one before if it was a single, if it is the start of a new pair, work it in the opposite direction of the set before. Work 2 DC in between the first and second post of the 3 DC, then work 2 DC in between the second and third post. Then, look ahead to the direction of posts and determine which direction your post needs to be around the 3rd post of the 3 DC. Repeat from * around the entire blanket.

Tip: the only stitch not worked around is the middle DC of the 3 DC from the row below that made the corner.

Do not join at the end of the round, do not turn. 

Round 3: Work FPDC around FPDC posts and BPDC around BPDC posts. When you reach the corner, treat the 2 DC from the row below as new posts to be worked around and work them in the direction needed to maintain the pattern. Work 3 DC in the space between the 2 sets of DC. Treat the next set of 2 DC as new posts to work around, looking ahead to maintain the pattern. If there is a single, still work in the direction needed. 

Round 4: Work BPDC around FPDC posts and FPDC around BPDC posts reversing the directions of the posts. Treat the corners in the same manner as round two. Do not join at the end of the round, do not turn. 

Round 5: Continue working FPDC around FPDC and BPDC around BPDC and work the corners in the same manner as round three.

Round 6: Continue working FPDC around FPDC and BPDC around BPDC and work the corners in the same manner as round two. 

Slip stitch to the next stitch after you finish making the corner of round six, tie off and weave in all the ends. 

Tip: Since Velvet is slippery, tie the joining ends together in knots before weaving them in. Leave longer than normal ends to tie in, approximately 12 inches. Also, while weaving an end in, I will find inconspicuous spots to knot it around stitches for extra security. 

Here is a video I made to help you make a practice swatch first. I really think it’s important to make one so you know for sure that your loops will not come free and that you are working with the correct hook size. 

As always, I’m so happy to share what I’m making with you all. What a blessing and a joy you bring into our lives.

If you make this throw, or have any questions about this pattern, please join the Daisy Farm Crafter Group on Facebook. We have gathered together a whole community of crocheters making Daisy Farm patterns and it’s fun to see the patterns made in different colors or yarn. 

Happy Crocheting! 

Tiffany