Linked Stitch

I love the textured look of this stitch. I call this the front side.

 

I recently used this stitch as the border for the polka dot blanket. I wanted to explain it in detail in a stitches only post in case you would like to use this stitch for a different project. It is not specific for a border.

I learned this stitch from an old crochet book that I have, and I’m sure it’s been around for years. I’ve also seen this stitch called linked treble crochet. I think the important word to describe this stitch is linked. It can be made as tall or as short as you like. You don’t have to be beholden to just a treble.

 

Does this look familiar? It’s worked the same way as Tunisian crochet…sort of. I think this looks like the back.

The above picture is the back side of the stitch, if it looks very similar to Tunisian crochet to you, you are right! The difference with this stitch is that you are working vertical to the chain, instead of horizontal. You’ll see what I mean when you watch the video clip:

 

Here are the written instructions:

Make any length of chain, preferably 20 chains or more, just to give you some room to practice. Insert your hook in the second chain from the hook and pull up a loop, then insert your hook into the third chain from the hook and pull up a loop, then insert your hook into the fourth chain from the hook and pull up a loop, and then into the fifth chain from the hook and pull up a loop. (here is where you could keep going and make your stitch even taller, just keep pulling up loops!)

Now, YO (yarn over) and pull through two loops, YO and pull through two more loops, YO and pull through two more loops, YO and pull through the final two loops on the hook. You have just completed the stitch. To start the next stitch, insert your hook under the horizontal bar and pull up a loop, insert your hook under the next horizontal bar and pull up a loop, and insert your hook under the final horizontal bar and pull up a loop, then insert your hook into the next chain space and pull up a loop. Finish the stitch in the same manner as before by YO and pull through two loops, etc.

Do you see how you are working the chain vertically? This is how it is different than Tunisian. In Tunisian you would be working down the whole row of chains, chaining one at the end and then working all the way back and your project would grow horizontally.

I’m using this stitch in my next gingham project. Here’s a glimpse:

 

Each of the blocks are worked using the linked stitch 10 chains high. I am working the entire block of color for 8 linked stitches then changing colors. It’s working out well! And if you’ve already done a gingham blanket and didn’t care for the yarn being carried through, this might be a nice alternative for you. I am weaving in some ends though, but it’s not overwhelming. and I’m crocheting over a few.

I hope you give this stitch a try! I also just did a hat using this stitch and it turned out so cute! I’ll get some pictures of that up soon!

Much love to you all! Thanks for stopping by the Daisy Farm!

xxoo

Tiffany

p.s. come find me on Instagram and tag me with your gorgeous makes!