Beginner Herringbone Half Stitch Blanket

It makes my mom heart so happy when my daughter Nicolina keeps practicing her crochet skills and designs a new blanket at the same time. She is a busy Senior UX Designer for a financial company in Salt Lake City and in her free time is picking up a crochet hook and making blankets. 

Hannah and I love seeing her striped designs. I’ll show them at the end of this post if you want to see all the beauties she has made. This is number 4. 

I like how her tension is improving and also that she is working her way through all the stitches we have under the menu heading “stitches.” 

I don’t know of a better way to become better with crochet than to keep making things! (And I’m going to let you in on a little secret, I am keeping all these blankets she is making to give to her future children. I think they would love seeing and having the blankets she makes even though she doesn’t think so.)

My daughter Nicolina holding up the 4th blanket she has made. (I had to beg and bribe in order to get this picture.)

The stitch she used is the Herringbone Half Double Crochet. It is just one step different than a double crochet. Essentially, you yarn over, insert your hook into the stitch, yarn over and pull a loop back through and continue pulling through the first loop on the hook. Then, yarn over again and pull through the remaining two loops on the hook. 

Click this picture if you’d like to just see a demonstration of the stitch. A full blanket tutorial is below.

Materials

Size 36 x 45 (It’s a kid’s size throw)

2 balls Red Heart Hygge Charm in Moonlight

2 balls Red Heart Hygge Charm in Meteor

1 ball Red Heart Hygge Charm in Shooting Star

Details about Hygge Charm: 

  • Content: 97% acrylic, 3% other fibers
  • Ball size: 198 g/7 oz, 395 meters/432 yards
  • Care: Machine wash and dry
  • Gauge: 4 – Medium

Size I-5.5mm hook 

Scissors

Tapestry Needle 

Stitch Marker

(A PDF of this pattern is available on Etsy.)

Pattern

Chain 130 with Meteor (the pink color) (There is no pattern repeat, if you want to make this a different size, chain to the width you would like your blanket to be, but also keep in mind that the height will be about the same if you follow the color striping she did.)

ROW 1: In the third chain from the hook, work 1 Herringbone Half Double Crochet (HHDC) into each chain across to the end. (128 stitches made) Chain 1 and turn. (A HHDC means to YO, insert your hook, pull up a loop and pull directly through first loop on hook, then YO and pull through remaining two loops.)

ROW 2: In the first stitch, work 1 HHDC. Work 1 HHDC into each stitch across the row. Chain 1 and turn. (128)

Tip: Immediately after working the first HHDC of the row, use a stitch marker and mark that stitch. Then when you return, you will know that is the last stitch of the row. This will help you keep the sides straight and you won’t have to count 128 stitches across every time. 

You will continue with this stitch for the entire blanket. Below are the color changes. 

12 rows Meteor (Pink), 6 rows Moonlight (Ivory), 2 rows Shooting Star (grey), 6 rows Moonlight, 24 rows Meteor, 12 rows Moonlight, 4 rows Shooting Star, 12 rows Moonlight, 24 rows Meteor, 6 rows Moonlight, 2 rows Shooting Star, 6 rows Moonlight, 12 rows Meteor. 

How to change colors: When it is time to add in a new color, work to the very last stitch of the row and only finish making the first step of that stitch. Before pulling through and finishing the stitch, lay the new color across the hook and pull through with the new color. Cut the old color leaving about a 9 inch tail to weave in later. Begin crocheting with the new color. 

How to weave in the ends: When you are finished with the entire blanket and before you start the border take the time to weave in the ends. You will use a tapestry needle to thread the yarn in and out any of the stitches that are the same color. Weave in and out several times to secure the ends. Cut the tail close to the blanket and the end will disappear into the blanket. 

The trickiest part of a border is usually the sides of the blanket. Try very hard to just work one stitch per the end of the row. If it is ruffling like in this picture, try switching to a hook one size smaller as you work the sides. Then you can switch back the larger hook for the ends.

Border

Pull up a loop in the bottom right hand corner by simply laying the yarn over your hook and pulling the yarn up. Then chain 1. Work 1 HHDC into that same corner space. Work 1 HHDC into the end of each row up the side of the blanket. 

Working on the side of the blanket is very tricky. Do your best to only work one stitch per row. 

When you get to the next corner, work 3 HHDC into the same corner stitch. 

Continue working one stitch per stitch and 3 HHDC into the corner spaces. 

When you return to the starting corner, work 1 HHDC, then Slip Stitch (SL ST) to the starting stitch, Chain 1 and continue working in the same direction working 1 HHDC into each stitch and 3 HHDC into the middle stitch of the 3 HHDC stitches that made up the corner of the row below. 

You may work this border as many rounds as you’d like. We only did 2 rounds. 

Slip stitch to the beginning stitch, then tie off and weave in the end. 

I’m really impressed with the even look to her stitches here. It takes lots of practice to get your tension the same throughout the entire blanket.

If you want to watch a tutorial I made video demonstration on Youtube that will go over the basics that I talked about here.  

Here is the blanket journey of Nicolina so far. (We really, really love her striped designs!) 

Number 1: The Modern Crochet Velvet Throw

She learned the wide HDC or working in between the posts stitch on this one. She learned color changes as well.

Number 2: Velvet Beginner Blanket

More practice with velvet and with the wide HDC stitch.

Number 3: Velvet Stripes Blanket

She learned how to work a border on this one! She did ribbing around the entire blanket.

I’m excited to watch her skills improve as well as see her unique stripe designs! 

Now let’s see your blanket! Come and share it with us! Find us on Facebook or Instagram. Use #daisyfarmcrafts on your Instagram posts so we can find them. 

Thanks for all the love! 

xoxo, Tiffany

 

 

Beginner Herringbone Half Blanket

Beginner Herringbone Half Blanket

Kids Size throw 36x45 inches

Materials

  • 2 balls Red Heart Hygge Charm in Moonlight
  • 2 balls Red Heart Hygge Charm in Meteor
  • 1 ball Red Heart Hygge Charm in Shooting Star
  • Details about Hygge Charm:
  • Content: 97% acrylic, 3% other fibers
  • Ball size: 198 g/7 oz, 395 meters/432 yards
  • Care: Machine wash and dry
  • Gauge: 4 – Medium

Tools

  • Size I 5.5mm hook
  • Scissors
  • Tapestry Needle
  • Stitch Marker

Instructions

Chain 130 with Meteor (the pink color) (There is no pattern repeat, if you want to make this a different size, chain to the width you would like your blanket to be, but also keep in mind that the height will be about the same if you follow the color striping she did.)

Row 1: In the third chain from the hook, work 1 Herringbone Half Double Crochet going forward the abbreviation will be HHDC) work 1 HHDC into each chain across to the end. (128 stitches made) Chain 1 and turn. 

Row 2: In the first stitch, work 1 HHDC. Work 1 HHDC into each stitch across the row. Chain 1 and turn. (128)

Tip: Immediately after working the first HHDC of the row, use a stitch marker and mark that stitch. Then when you return, you will know that is the last stitch of the row. This will help you keep the sides straight and you won’t have to count 128 stitches across every time. 

You will continue with this stitch for the entire blanket. Below are the color changes. 

12 rows Meteor (Pink), 6 rows Moonlight (Ivory), 2 rows Shooting Star (grey), 6 rows Moonlight, 24 rows Meteor, 12 rows Moonlight, 4 rows Shooting Star, 12 rows Moonlight, 24 rows Meteor, 6 rows Moonlight, 2 rows Shooting Star, 6 rows Moonlight, 12 rows Meteor. 

How to change colors: When it is time to add in a new color, work to the very last stitch of the row and only finish making the first step of that stitch. Before pulling through and finishing the stitch, lay the new color across the hook and pull through with the new color. Cut the old color leaving about a 9-inch tail to weave in later. Begin crocheting with the new color. 

How to weave in the ends: When you are finished with the entire blanket and before you start the border take the time to weave in the ends. You will use a tapestry needle to thread the yarn in and out any of the stitches that are the same color. Weave in and out several times to secure the ends. Cut the tail close to the blanket and the end will disappear into the blanket. 

Border: 

Pull up a loop in the bottom right-hand corner by simply laying the yarn over your hook and pulling the yarn up. Then chain 1. Work 1 HHDC into that same corner space. Work 1 HHDC into the end of each row up the side of the blanket. 

Working on the side of the blanket is very tricky. Do your best to only work one stitch per row. 

When you get to the next corner, work 3 HHDC into the same corner stitch. 

Continue working one stitch per stitch and 3 HHDC into the corner spaces. 

When you return to the starting corner, work 1 HHDC, then Slip Stitch (SL ST) to the starting stitch, CHain 1 and continue working in the same direction working 1 HHDC into each stitch and 3 HHDC into the middle stitch of the 3 HHDC stitches that made up the corner of the row below. 

You may work this border as many rounds as you’d like. We only did 2 rounds. 

Slip stitch to the beginning stitch, then tie off and weave in the end.